Landscapes of Resilience Overview

15/1/2015

The Landscapes of Resilience project involves trans-disciplinary research, design, and Open Spaces Sacred Places (OSSP) creation in Joplin, MO and New York City. These two communities face distinct stressors, operating in different contexts: the 2011 EF5 tornado in Joplin and the 2012 Hurricane Sandy in New York. Both places draw upon unique histories, cultures, and sets of assets to create OSSPs. The intent, purpose, goals, location, target audience, and programming of the new OSSPs are determined through community-led planning processes in response to local needs and priorities. These OSSPs create new narratives of hope, transformation and recovery.

Our team views OSSPs as crucial pieces of infrastructure that are unique, adaptive, and vital to community health and well-being, particularly in response to natural disasters and other stressors. Our research and experience suggest that OSSPs serve as catalyzing mechanisms within systems that confer resilience across individual, family, community, and social-ecological scales and over time—including immediately post-disturbance, during stages of recovery, and over long term processes of neighborhood and community change.

We hypothesize that the benefits of these catalytic spaces come from their physical design, the way in which their users interact with open space, and the processes involved in their creation – acts of civic engagement, community stewardship, and collective remembering. We seek to understand how the production and presence of green spaces, such as OSSPs, contributes to multi-scalar resilience and can support recovery from a wide range of human, natural, technological, and political disturbances and perturbations.

CITYGREEN, January 15, 2015.

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About Us

We are a private nonprofit that supports, informs, and inspires the creation of publicly accessible urban green spaces. We believe that every city resident needs nearby green space to provide opportunities for mindfulness, respite, and renewal. The Foundation has issued its final grants to build five Open Spaces Sacred Places and research the impacts on a variety of users with the hope that the powerful connection between nature, spirit and human wellbeing will be scientifically proven.

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